The Arena of Gladiators

Lithodomos VRReleased Jul 2017
Lithodomos VRReleased Jul 2017

Description

Picture yourself as a Gladiator. Your palms are sweaty and your heart pounds deep in your chest. You are about to enter the Arènes de Lutèce, an ancient Roman Arena, and do battle in front of a blood-thirsty crowd of thousands. The locals want a fierce competition, and want to see all of your fighting skills, using an array of available weapons. 

Standing in the centre of the arena, the observer has 360 degree views inside the reconstructed amphitheatre. 

Now picture yourself as a spectator. You walk through the streets of Lutèce (modern-day Paris) towards the Arena, with 12,000-16,000 spectators as companions, anticipating a relaxing day of pleasure watching the blood-sports of the day. You take your seat next to other excited visitors and watch the drama unfold in the centre of the arena.

Seated in the arena, you can imagine what it was like to watch gladiatorial contests, games with wild beasts and, as a complete contrast, plays with the stage area capable of turning into a theatre. 

This Lithodomos VR experience is not just engaging and entertaining, but is a valuable educational tool of great historical significance. Every detail has been researched and approved and is backed-up by archaeological evidence.

Fun Facts: Hidden among the laneways of Paris’ 5th arrondissement is the remains of the Arènes de Lutèce, built at the beginning of the 2nd century AD. Today, in central Paris, France it is used as a communal park with only fragments of the original structured visible.

The amphitheatre was re-discovered in 1860 during the construction of Rue Monge, where it was excavated under the order of Napoleon III. A community effort, led by influential writer Victor Hugo, saw that this piece of Parisian history remained open and maintained (by the newly created Société des Amis des Arenès). Today it is used as a communal park with only fragments of the original structured visible.

Standing in the centre of the arena, the observer has 360 degree views inside the reconstructed amphitheatre. Additional scenes have the viewer in the seating area, much higher than the present-day remains.

What's New

First Version

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